JetBlue: “You Above All”

[Why is this news about the Mormon church (of Satan) and its leaders national news? What kind of secret satanic society hidden code messaging is this all about?:]

(MSN News, August 9, 2017, www.msn.com )

jetBlue YOU ABOVE ALL 
NEW YORK CITY TO PHOENIX FROM $152 one-way

THERE ARE NO SHORTCUTS TO GOOSE IPA.  GOOSE ISLAND
SALT LAKE CITY — A Mormon church leader was removed from his post and kicked out of the religion Tuesday for the first time in nearly three decades.

James J. Hamula was released from a mid-level leadership council based on disciplinary action by the religion’s highest leaders, said Eric Hawkins, a spokesman for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Hawkins didn’t say why Hamula was ousted, but the Utah-based church said it was not for apostasy, which refers to teaching inaccurate doctrine or publicly defying guidance from church leaders.

Efforts to reach Hamula at listed phone numbers were not successful.

The last leader to be excommunicated was the late George P. Lee in 1989 after Lee, an American Indian, called Mormon leaders racist. The church said then that Lee was removed for “apostasy and other conduct unbecoming a member of the church.”

The last church leader removed before Lee was Richard R. Lyman, who was excommunicated in 1943 for adultery but baptized again 11 years later.

Hamula became a member of a group called the “General Authority Seventy” in 2008. It is a group of nearly 90 leaders that sit below the church president, his two counselors and two other levels of leaders.

They help run church operations by serving as a bridge between local lay leaders in Mormon congregations around the world and the top leaders working at church headquarters in Salt Lake City.

Hamula’s removal is surprising because he was well-regarded and was even considered by some outside Mormon scholars as a possible candidate to join the high-level Quorum of the Twelve Apostles when the church was filling three vacancies in 2015, said Matthew Bowman, a Mormon scholar and history professor at Henderson State University.

Hamula was not chosen, but he was still considered an up-and-comer destined for more important assignments, Bowman said. In recent years, Hamula served in important roles as assistant executive director of church history and executive director of a department that reviews all documents published by the church.

“He had a promising future,” Bowman said.

His removal will likely be talked about among some of the nearly 16 million worldwide members of the Mormon religion, but it may not cause a huge stir because it may be the first time many have heard of Hamula, Bowman said.

Hamula was born in Long Beach, California, and is married with six children, according to his church biography. He was a lawyer until joining the leadership council in 2008.

That year, he gave a speech at a Mormon conference watched by millions about choosing good over evil.

“Satan is marshaling every resource at his disposal to entice you into transgression,” Hamula said. “He knows that if he can draw you into transgression, he may prevent you from serving a full-time mission, marrying in the temple, and securing your future children in the faith, all of which weakens not only you but the church.”

FILE - This Aug. 4, 2015, file photo, flowers bloom in front of the Salt Lake Temple, at Temple Square, in Salt Lake City. Mormon church leader James J. Hamula was removed Tuesday, Aug. 8, 2017, from a mid-level leadership council for undisclosed reasons based on disciplinary action by the religion's highest leaders. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
© The Associated Press FILE – This Aug. 4, 2015, file photo, flowers bloom in front of the Salt Lake Temple, at Temple Square, in Salt Lake City. Mormon church leader James J. Hamula was removed Tuesday, Aug. 8, 2017, from a mid-level leadership…
(MSN News, August 9, 2017,
http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/mormon-church-leader-excommunicated-for-1st-time-in-decades/ar-AApJxwx?li=BBmkt5R&ocid=spartanntp)
Goose Island State Park
Big tree.jpg

The “Big Tree” at Goose Island State Park is thought to be 1000 years old.

Goose Island State Park is a state park in the U.S. state of Texas, located north of the city of Rockport on the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. The park covers 321.4 acres (130 ha). It is surrounded by both St. Charles and Aransas Bays.

The park was established on land acquired from private owners between the years 1931–35. The Civilian Conservation Corps built the earliest facilities.

The park is home to “The Big Tree“, a Southern live oak (Quercus virginiana), thought to be over 1000 years old. It has a circumference of 35 feet (11 m), is 44 feet (13 m) in height and has a crown spread of 90 feet (27 m).

Although it is located on the seashore, there is no designated swimming area at the park, as the shoreline consists of concrete, oyster shell, mudflat, and marsh grass. Instead, the main park activities include camping, birding, fishing, and boating. The park averages more than 60,000 overnight campers each year and has about 200,000 visitors annually. There are 45 shade shelters with electricity and water on the island. There are 57 shelters with electricity and water, and 27 with water and no electricity. Speckled trout, redfish, drum, flounder, and sheepshead are a few of the fish caught.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goose_Island_State_Park

 

August 9, 2017, 9am.  About Me.  I’m at Starbucks, Atlantic Terminal.  A few minutes ago one of the barristers called the name of one of the customers, Mariana, so, I went to Wikipedia, to copy past and post, this:

The Mariana Islands (also the Marianas) are a crescent-shaped archipelago comprising the summits of fifteen mostly dormant volcanic mountains in the western North Pacific Ocean, between the 12th and 21st parallels north and along the 145th meridian east. They lie south-southeast of Japan, west-southwest of Hawaii, north of New Guinea and east of the Philippines, demarcating the Philippine Sea‘s eastern limit. They are found in the northern part of the western Oceanic sub-region of Micronesia, and are politically divided into two jurisdictions of the United States: the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and, at the southern end of the chain, the territory of Guam.

The islands were named after the Spanish queen Mariana of Austria. Spaniards, who in the early 16th century were the first Europeans to arrive, eventually annexed and colonized the archipelago. The indigenous inhabitants are the Chamoru. Archaeologists in 2013 reported findings which indicated that the people who first settled the Marianas arrived there after making what was at the time the longest uninterrupted ocean voyage in human history. They further reported findings which suggested that Tinian is likely to have been the first island in Oceania to have been settled by humans.[1]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mariana_Islands

Territory of Guam

Guåhån
Anthem: Fanohge Chamoru
“Stand Ye Guamanians”

Guam (/ˈɡwɑːm/ or /ˈɡwɒm/; Chamorro: Guåhån [ˈɡʷɑhɑn]) is a United States Territory in the western Pacific Ocean.[3][4] The capital city is Hagåtña and the most populous city is Dededo. In 2017, 162,742 people resided on Guam. Guamanians are American citizens by birth. Guam has an area of 210 sq mi (544 km²) and a population density of 770/sq mi (297/km²). It is the largest and southernmost of the Mariana Islands and the largest island in Micronesia. Among its municipalities, Mongmong-Toto-Maite has the highest density at 3,691/sq mi (1,425/km²), whereas Inarajan and Umatac have the lowest density at 119/sq mi (47/km²). The highest point is Mount Lamlam at 406 meters (1,332 ft) above sea level.

The Chamorros, Guam’s indigenous people, settled the island approximately 4,000 years ago. Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan, while in the service of Spain, was the first European to visit the island on March 6, 1521. Guam was colonized by Spain in 1668 with settlers, like Diego Luis de San Vitores, a Catholic missionary. Between the 16th century and the 18th century, Guam was an important stopover for the Spanish Manila Galleons. During the Spanish–American War, the United States captured Guam on June 21, 1898. Under the Treaty of Paris, Spain ceded Guam to the United States on December 10, 1898. Guam is among the seventeen Non-Self-Governing Territories of the United Nations.[5]

Before World War II, Guam and four other territories – American Samoa, Hawaii, Wake Island, and the Philippines – were the only American jurisdictions in the Pacific Ocean. On December 7, 1941, hours after the attack on Pearl Harbor, Guam was captured by the Japanese, who occupied the island for two and a half years. During the occupation, Guamanians were subjected to beheadings, forced labor, rape, and torture.[6][7][8] American forces recaptured the island on July 21, 1944; Liberation Day commemorates the victory.[9] Since the 1960s, the economy has been supported by two industries: tourism and the United States Armed Forces.[10]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guam


Mushroom cloud from the largest atmospheric nuclear test the United States ever conducted, Castle Bravo.

American bunker located in Bikini Atoll


Rear of bunker

From 1946 to 1958, the early years of the Cold War, the United States tested 67 nuclear weapons at its Pacific Proving Grounds located in the Marshall Islands,[32] including the largest atmospheric nuclear test ever conducted by the U.S., code named Castle Bravo.[33] “The bombs had a total yield of 108,496 kilotons, over 7,200 times more powerful than the atomic weapons used during World War II.”[34] With the 1952 test of the first U.S. hydrogen bomb, code named “Ivy Mike,” the island of Elugelab in the Enewetak atoll was destroyed. In 1956, the United States Atomic Energy Commission regarded the Marshall Islands as “by far the most contaminated place in the world.”[35]

Nuclear claims between the U.S. and the Marshall Islands are ongoing, and health effects from these nuclear tests linger.[33] [36] Project 4.1 was a medical study conducted by the United States of those residents of the Bikini Atoll exposed to radioactive fallout. From 1956 to August 1998, at least $759 million was paid to the Marshallese Islanders in compensation for their exposure to U.S. nuclear weapon testing.[37][38]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marshall_Islands#Nuclear_testing_during_the_Cold_War